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Apartment

Not everyone lives – or wants to live – in a house and millions of people are looking for examples of stylish apartment interior design. Across the globe, families make their homes in apartments that are polished, organized and beautiful. Shoot brings you a collection of chic apartment interior design showcasing the possibilities. From contemporary neutrals and modern white designs to warm wood-filled interiors, inspiration for your apartment abounds.

Beautifully linear MX581 residential building built by HGR Arquitectos to surround circular Japanese-style garden

By • Jan 22, 2019

Located in the heart of Mexico City, a recently finished residential building perfectly encircles a lovely Japanese-style garden, creating a beautifully green central focus that feels like a haven in the midst of urban life.

 built the MX581 apartments around a circular courtyard that, from the outside, can hardly be detected. This keeps the Japanese guava tree and surrounding greenery blooming there almost like a secret that residents can enjoy privately or share with visitors and friends.

Besides the garden, which is undoubtedly the main attraction for visitors, the MX581 building also boasts a parking garage, a convenient location near the Autonomous University of Mexico, and a series of 12 spacious apartments spread across four vertical levels.

In choosing the layout of the structure, designers opted for a rectangular base shape. This left room for the circular courtyard in the centre, where the guava tree grows. An L-shaped access point, also featuring lovely greenery, leads visitors to the more private area, away from the street.

Inside the Japanese-style garden, residents can sit on benches to enjoy the scene or lounge on lush grassy patches. In the very middle, a pool filled with gravel, like a simple rock garden, surrounds a large planter where the guava tree grows like a featured art piece. Each apartment in the building has windows and balconies facing inwards so the tree’s beauty can be viewed from inside the units as well.

At the front exterior of the building, you’ll notice several porch-like spaces marking each unit. This is where the apartments are built into a back base structure. On the inner side, the balconies surrounding the tree are black and curved around, creating a contrast in shape an experience depending on where in the apartment you choose to sit in order to take in some fresh air.

Continuing the theme of wonderful shared and open concept space, the ground floor apartments also feature semi-private patios next to the inner courtyard. This is where residents can open up their kitchens, living rooms, and dining rooms for more sunshine and fantastic air flow, with free movement between the rooms and the social areas.

The inner courtyard isn’t the only place that features a luscious green element in MX581. The side of the building where the bedrooms are situated, away from the courtyard for more privacy, has been planted with various local shrubs. This lets residents enjoy a bit of nature no matter where they choose to spend their time. The plants also act as a sound barrier for noise from the street outside! At the top of the building, penthouse units have access to a rooftop terrace, where the theme of lush greenery can be taken in as well.

Inside the units, MX581’s apartments present a stark but wonderful contrast to both the exterior of the building and their own features. Compared to the concrete exterior walls, the finish inside is a clean, pale white offset by gleaming wooden floors and fine details. The effect is to give neutral, natural atmospheres that play well off the prevalent plant life.

Photographs by

The Line Lofts by SPF: architects gives residents a modern, shared space community at home

By • Jan 8, 2019

Right in thee star studded thick of Hollywood, California,  has create a residential project called The Line Lofts in an attempt to facilitate a more community based and social space heavy living experience!

In total, the Line Lots building is home to 82 lovely suites in one of LA’s most active up and coming neighbourhooods. Sitting tall on Las Palmas Ave, just steps away from the renowned intersection at Hollywood and Highland, extending six storeys into the air, making it the tallest residential unit in the area.

Part of the reason the building stands so high is that the plot of land designers had to work with was quite limited at its base. Besides organizing space carefully, the crew aimed to make sure the apartments were particularly well lit. Traditional ideas of standard apartment floor plans simply wouldn’t do here, however, so designers got creative instead.

Scrapping traditional floor plans meant there was more space in the design for more fluid layouts. Rather than simply linking floors to the ones above and below, multi-floor links are built through vertical corridors that let residents skip floors or travel straight up to an open air courtyard on the top of the building. This also gives a visual variation inside and removes repetition of space as people move through the building.

This particular residential project offers a plethora of unique social spaces as well. These include a workspace and wet bar immediately located in the reception, a courtyard pool up top, and even a pool lounge with floor to ceiling glass walls so that guests can get out of the sun without interrupting their visual flow, creating a clear interior-exterior relationship.

The units themselves are also designed to optimized the amount of natural light in each room. In each apartment, walls are primarily made up on the exterior sides of oversized windows with sliding sections that lead to atrium shaped balconies, one for each suite. The balconies are are recessed into the face of the building to create a smooth face that offers some shade.

In addition to space limitations, there were certain budget restrictions that designers had to work with that required them to think creatively once more in terms of materiality. Here, off the shelf products could bring the cost of construction down but selections had to be very unique and specific to make sure things still looked quite custom.

In order to give the facade of the building a little more visual interest, designers made the front facade from a combination of corrugated metal and plaster alternated one after the other to create a pattern that appears animated and flowing of its own volition. This is thanks to the smoothness of the plaster sandwiched between the roughness of the metal pieces with their metallic finish. A cohesiveness with the environment around the building is created in the way the metal pieces reflect the sky at different parts of the day.

On the ground and second floors, the units expand vertically from one to the other, rather than being arranged as single-floor units on each. This lets the spaces appear more open and gather more natural light and also affords the rooms more privacy. Building upwards rather than horizontally accounted for the limitations in space at the base of the building.

Photographs by and

ARTE S by SPARK Architects provides guests with a uniquely shaped residential escape and sunshine space

By • Jan 8, 2019

In the busy urban centre in Pinang, Malaysia,  recently created the visually stunning ARTE S building, a luxury residential building that resembles a spa and pool resort, giving residents a place to escape in the middle of the city.

Located in Jalan Bukit Gambier, near the better city of George Town, this project includes a pair of tall, undulating condominium towers that boast 460 residential units between them. The taller tower of the two is stands 180 metres tall and can be seen off the island from the mainland clearly in the distance.

Bukit Gambir is a lush topical mountain located right at the heart of Pengang Island, which lies off the Western coast of Malaysia. The towers are incredibly unique in the way their facade undulates at each layer. This lovely effect was intended to mimic the dramatic topography of the land surrounding the buildings, which varies between steeply rising hillsides and low coastlines.

Besides just undulating, the towers also appeared layered where the balconies sit. This mimics the mountainous landscape as well, with the graduated terrace effect mirroring the gradient of the rock faces. This effect was achieved using a construction technique called elliptical floor plating, which builders augmented with an added waveform birse-soleil that very carefully, subtly, and precisely rotated each floor a particular degree to give the buildings their twisted appearance.

Besides looking amazing in themselves, the towers are built with the intention of offering the best view of the ocean that one can find anywhere on the island. The taller of the two climbs 50 storeys high, while the shorter rises only 32. In each one, the penthouses at the top are sculpted from the final three floorplates.

On the very top of the highest tower sits a sky garden that incorporates two pebble-form recreational “resident club” pods. In the larger one, up to 60 people can be accommodated for events while the smaller hanging pod is home to luxury jacuzzi. Together the two pods create a wonderfully dramatic visual fro, the ground that acts as a signature for the building while also providing residents with an unparalleled view of George Town and the Straight of Pengang.

Inside, the units are entirely designed for flexibility and tropical living. They are open concept with no beams or poles, meaning they can be arranged in any way and at any time. The units are also specifically designed to bring in light and air naturally, eliminating the need for air conditioning and thereby saving hydro costs. In the common areas, the spaces are naturally ventilated and day-lit as well.

Around the building, several perimeter gardens have been planted at the base. These shroud the residential car park in lovely, local tropical plants that thrive in the area’s climate and would grow nearby naturally. This lovely green life contrasts beautifully with the modern appearance of the buildings and their shape, creating more texture for the eye to take in.

Of course, the pools at the base of the towers are an immediately noticeable primary feature. Their clear blue water attracts the eye and gives off a stunning reflection that mirrors the undulating visual motion of the buildings, enticing just about anyone who sets eyes on them and letting calming shapes set the atmosphere.

Photographs by

Architecture designs Tribeca Loft for modern professionals who need a place to live, work, and socialize

By • Jan 7, 2019

In the boroughs of New York City, innovative designers  has designed a stunning apartment called the Tribeca Loft, harnessing the visuals of simplistic living with the unique and swanky style of The Big Apple.

In some cases, living in a “bohemian style” means sacrificing space and embracing open concept past what’s comfortable until things feel cramped or disorganized. In the Tribeca Loft, however, these things are replace by a sense of singular charm and individual privacy. This is partially due to the fact that the loft is filled with natural light and uninterrupted views of the surrounding city.

To some, loft living is quite at odds with the needs of a modern family and their demands for private space and distinct personal areas. Thanks to careful and precise organization, however, all of the amenities of this apartment have been included into an open space that was recently transformed from a 19th century landmark warehouse. Now it’s a cleverly laid out and comfortable new home for a young family!

This apartment was originally built with a much more closed off design, featuring labyrinth-like hallways and small, divided rooms. In this renovation, designers first gutted the loft down to its barest bones in order to open the space up entirely. They kept only the key structural elements and primary service zones (like the kitchen). Their hope in opening the space up was to create a better flowing relationship between public and private sectors of the home.

Now, with the dividing walls removed and more creative structures in place to delineate space such as the wooden entertainment unit, the living room, den, and kitchen areas bask in waves of natural light during the day. Despite having been opened up, however, strategic storage and furniture placement has stopped this new layout from disturbing the peace and privacy of the sleeping areas.

The creative space definers that have replaced limiting walls were chosen for their function as well as their ability to break up the “rooms”. For example, designers differentiated between certain areas using built-in accessories like free standing multi-purpose cabinetry made of walnut, several full-height sliding accordion panels, and even a wet bar.

The overall effect of this loft apartment since its transformation is one of peaceful activity. The atmosphere embraces and axudes both privacy and calm solitude but also airiness and a small emphasis on social spaces for bonding within the home.

Photographs by

The Arts District Loft by Marmol Radziner exudes simplistic creativity in the heart of Los Angeles

By • Jan 7, 2019

Smack in the middle of The Arts District in sunny Los Angeles, California, stands a building that’s home to the Art District Loft, a recently completed project designed and carried out by .

Within this project, designers altered a 2000 square foot condominium that was originally part of the Toy Factory Lofts. These were a residential initiative created in a 1924 warehouse in Downtown LA’s Art District. Within the alterations, designers removed many partitions in order to combine rooms and create more open concept spaces. One such room combination resulted in a beautiful master suite.

Besides the bedrooms, the living room was also reconfigured and fitted with new casework. Additionally, the kitchen, bathroom, and powder room were all renovated, just to make sure the entire loft got a bit of a contemporary update. Although designers wished to work with a much more open floor plan, they also aimed to create distinct areas for entertaining and socializing, making it easy for owners to have guests over.

Builders chose to create a more flowing and cohesive feeling between the interior of the apartment and the street outside as well. This was done primarily through the installation of stunning floor-to-ceiling windows that are unlike anything the original lofts had featured previously.

In order to keep things open, airy, filled with light, and flowing but also still give different areas a bit of distinction, furnishings and built-in features were used like markers. For example, a custom bookcase made with three bays that rotate 90 degrees each was placed strategically in order to mark the border between the living room and the master suite. When the bays are turned to open, natural light floods both spaces, but turning the case back closes the bedroom off a little more privately.

The existing space is quite natural but industrial chic thanks to the use of concrete. This exposed material is used on the floor, walls, and ceiling, contrasting very well indeed with the inviting slightly more modern interior furnishings designers selected within the space. These are made up of an assortment of wood and metal finishes with interesting textures being prioritized. The contrast softens the space and warms the atmosphere up a little.

A primarily grey colour palette helps to warm the space up as well! Black is also heavily featured to create even more contrast with the concrete and the result is comfortable to look at but also quite streamlined and sophisticated.

Photographs by

German Main East Side Lofts created by 1100 Architect as an artistic update to a pre-war building

By • Jan 4, 2019

In the centre of the beautiful Germany city of Frankfurt, a pre-war residential building has been given facelift in order to not just update it but transform it into a piece of veritable street art. Main East Side Lofts by  attracts the eye and plays with visuals in a way that’s very unique indeed.

The Main East Side Lofts are part of a mixed-use building that stands high in a rapidly changing neighbour undergoing several update projects in the last few years. Originally, the building was intended to house a factory, but the design was never completed due to the outbreak of the First World War. Instead, it was used as a hospital first and worker’s housing later on.

In this updating project, designers work with Frankfurt’s Landmarks Department and settled on an acceptable plan that involved transforming the existing building, as well as creating a contemporary addition of equal size. To make the two parts look like a cohesive whole, the new addition matches the original building in volume, rhythm, and proportion but looks as thought that half has been reimagined in a modern language and with much newer materials, creating a beautiful overall contrast.

Now that the building has been finished, the facade makes the cityscape more interesting. Inspired by the original mansard roof, it was conceived and built like a continuous wrapped, meaning that the outer surface of the building seamlessly folds along the height of the structure’s face and stretches upward to form the roof.

On every surface, the facade uniformly features a cement fibreboard with brightly coloured reveals in the window insets that serve as a fun highlight from a distance. The panels of these coloured sections bend to reflect light and capture a range of visual tones all across the width and height of the building’s face. Because of its modern character and shape, this colour popping facade creates a sort of contemporary foil around the landmark structure it was added to.

Because it sits on the harbour, designers also wanted to make sure the new residential part of the building was sound proof and peaceful on the inside. This was partially achieve by careful material choices that help mitigate outside sounds. Acoustical double windows set deep into thick walls, for example, help deflect sound vibrations.

Inside, the apartments are structured like lofts that place a lot of importance of open space and flexibility. Of course, key characteristics of the original historic structure, like the high ceilings and the large double windows, were mimicked in the additional for lovely continuity, creating cohesiveness despite the non-traditional floor plans.

Photographs by

Swiss loft offers a fashionable, French-inspired getaway in the Alps

By • Dec 28, 2018

At the base of the Swiss Alps, a local designer and building company have created a stunning winter escape called The Heinza Julen Loft. Inspired by fashionable decor schemes typical of bygone French eras, yet still with a slight twist of modernity, this love getaway, located in Zermatt, Switzerland, is at once grand and cozy.

The loft is decently conservative in size, spanning about 300 square meters, and yet the classic wooden chalet style of most features blended with contemporary shapes and lines when it comes to furniture and fine details works in combination with floor to ceiling windows to make the space feel quite open and airy indeed.

The element of “fashion” that comes into play is evident in the more unique features, like the loft stool seating facing the window or the curtained jacuzzi tub situated to one side of the second social seating area are what gives things an unconventional twist. This is particularly true in contrast with the chopped firewood case and other wooden elements, like railings and wall paneling, throughout.

Impressively, the loft boasts three quite spacious bedrooms, each with its own breathtaking view of the Swiss village beyond where it stands. This view is thanks to additional floor to ceiling French windows, just like those found in the living room. A cozy relaxation room, filled with contemporary but comfortable couches filled with cushions, is fortunate enough to have a similarly lovely view.

Besides the sheer stylishness of its aesthetic, the actual atmosphere within the loft apartment makes it stand out as well. This is thanks to the outstanding amount of light that floods each room on lovely, bright afternoons all year round. Together with the refined nature of how the apartment has been styled, an unique environment of sheer cheerful sophistication has been established.

Dark, Sensual Villa 29 by ALL in STUDIO LTD Gives Mod Style Experience

By • Dec 17, 2018

Located in the hear of Sofia, Bulgaria, a wonderfully stylish and sensually dark dwelling called Villa 29 offers guests and owners a calmly modern experience in every room. Innovative architectural studio   designed and decorated the space using “nothing absolutely new”, making the villa a unique combination of sleek aesthetics and vintage appreciation.

The villa was designed with the intention of creating endless connections between artistic shapes, natural or upcycled materials, and cutting edge technologies. The goal was to use elements that have been seen and experiences previously in new blends, ultimately creating something entirely unique and never before seen.

The villa was created specifically for a young professional couple and their two children, both under the age of ten. Because the villa is located within a city centre, in the heart of a residential complex, the goal was to make it at once stand out and blend in; the structure of the apartment must make sense with the needs of someone living a cosmopolitan lifestyle and yet also give them a place to retreat to at the end of a busy urban day.

Designers hoped to help the family blend various styles and experiences in one place; they wanted spaces for comfort but elements of high-tech living. They wanted sophistication for guest hosting but also elements of being close to nature in order to benefit their children.

Perhaps the most interesting feature of the house is that behind its vintage inspired and rather mod looking facade, it’s actually also a “smart-house”. This means that just about everything in the home can be controlled from a cell phone. This gives homeowners ultimate customizability within each room and ultimately saves physical and electronic energy alike. It also makes the home very accessible for those with varying physical needs or abilities.

Working with a unique blend of the designer’s visions and the homeowners wants and needs, the overall team established a space that’s unique in its physical construction as well, before you even consider its decor or how it functions. Asymmetrical ceilings opened up many possibilities for playing with symmetry, for example, so the team extended from that idea and built a space that features unique shapes and visual textures all throughout.

Once shapes and space definitions were established, material blends were chosen. The young couple owning the villa wanted a modern overall atmosphere but were intent on using a blend of soft, natural materials. This is why a combination of wood and stone offsets the sleek black colour schemes and mod shapes seen throughout the rooms.

Despite the strong presence of black in the decor scheme, designers and owners alike agreed that the darkness anchored the spaces in a comfortable way that was balanced by the lighter, natural materials and the impressively unique lighting choices. They also made sure to lighten the scheme in areas meant specifically for the children, instead building airy spaces that let the children physically enjoy the room by getting active on climbing structures and stairs built right into the walls and construction.

Overall, each party was pleased with the way the finished villa offsets itself in innumerable ways; a sense of calm and quiet is easy to find in rooms that are at once elusive and coherent, visually stimulating and technologically practical. The formulation of the villa’s aesthetic in itself was practically an artistic feat!

Photographs by

Modern Functional Apartment by Atelier Alter Gives Young Family Style, Comfort, and Fun

By • Dec 7, 2018

In the heart of Beijing, China, the brand new Modern Functional Apartment by  reflects the characters, values, and personal styles of both the design team and the young, professional family it was completed for.

The intent of the apartment was to specifically cater to the wants and needs of the contemporary Chinese family. Designers strove to include shapes and layouts that might satisfy the requirements of a busy working family with kids who wanted to preserve style and streamline functions in their household.

Additionally, the clients wanted this to be a place where their kids could not only live, but also learn and gain quality family based experiences. Social spaces are driven towards bonding and productivity with their interesting shapes, free flowing movement capabilities and lack of clutter. At the same time they wanted it to be welcoming, warm, and comfortable.

Because the family also has an elder living with them, designers strove to make the house simple to care for. The goal was lots of space for storage, but in discreet places. They also prioritized low maintenance surfaces for simple care. Surrounding all of these other goals, sunlight was regarded as paramount. The family wanted bright, cheerful spaces where all generations of the family could come together and equally find what they need.

In the kitchen and living rooms, countertops are abundant. This is intended to give members of the family ample space to do any kind of activity they please. In fact, even the window sills have been transformed into usable, productive counter space! This balances the abundance of stack, cubic storage that gives the family plenty of space to keep their supplies for those activities in. Great examples of this can be seen in the cupboards in the kitchen and also in the entertainment system and media unit area in the living room.

Moving towards the bedrooms, you’ll find the space linearly arranged off a primary corridor. This structure ensures that kids have private, comfortable spaces of their own but still within easy access to parents. The children’s rooms have things like magnetic drawing boards built right into the walls for the multifaceted purposes of playing, learning, and creating.

Though the apartment is average in size, designers ensured that the family has plenty of space by following that linear structure throughout the entire home. Storage is piled high, doors and walls slide back into pockets to divides spaces can be expanded for easier flow and access, and smooth materials like wood and marble provide a colour scheme and aesthetic that suits those linear shapes.

At the same time, the team sought to create some contrast and balance in terms of shape by adding the occasional accented curve where space allowed. Certain waving features stand out against the otherwise linear shapes found in rooms and hallways and give the home visual texture and interested without interrupting function and flow as the family goes about their day. The idea, after all, was for furnishings and units to appear streamline, not sharp and intimidating.

Photographs by: Atelier Alter

Gorgeous Fairmont Penthouse Apartment by Inhouse Home to Celebrity Musician

By • Dec 5, 2018

Recently the stunning Fairmont Penthouse Apartment was overhauled and renovated by Inhouse to give a notable recording artist and musical entertainer a stylish, comfortable new home in Cape Town, South Africa.

The goal in establishing the aesthetic of this apartment’s transformation was almost entirely centred on modern sophistication. The penthouse is a double story apartment with three bedrooms, giving designers plenty of space to create impressively classy ambiance while also maximizing stunning views of Sea Point, in the heart of Cape Town.

The Fairmont building overlooks the Atlantic seaboard, so the original apartment that needed transforming was centred around the idea of offering dramatic seaside views and perfectly framing stunning sunsets from as many interior points of the home as possible. This characteristic was kept in the new project, but designers sought to drive the atmosphere more towards elegance than classic masculinity.

Stripping everything decorative (and even some functional things) down entirely on the inside, Inhouse began their project with a preserved basic structure but an otherwise blank canvas of bare concrete. They built an open-concept living space with a dark colour palette intended to feel deep and striking. Entertainment spaces are the first thing guests encounter upon entering the space, making it immediately feel welcoming and social.

On the apartment’s top floor, where the private areas like bedrooms and bathrooms lie, lighter tones were used to established a slightly more delicate aesthetic and decor scheme. Recessed LED light fixtures are featured both here and downstairs, giving the whole place proper illumination to offset dar decor tones.

In choosing which materials to work with, designers aimed for a balance of modern and natural, creating a unique blend in their sophisticated atmosphere. Walls, counters, and furnishings are made from upcycled timber, glass, steel, mirror, and marble in various combinations and colours. The end result is a feeling of sustainable luxury throughout.

One of the central features of the apartment is the circular stairwell. This makes all parts of the home simple to access, meaning anyone can enjoy the exceptional views the building has to offer. Black marble and strongly curved steel in the areas aim to make the journey from space to space feel profound and like a bit of a transformation between colour palettes. The furnishings and strong themes throughout the rooms make the entire home feel strikingly individual and unique.

Photographs by: Inhouse

Studio Loft Interior Design by Yerce Architeture + Zaas

By • Nov 21, 2018

The incredibly unique and visually impressive Studio Loft by  is a redesign project in Turkey that involved turning and old residential building into a stunning new photo studio and artistic workspace.

What’s perhaps most unique about this transformation from apartment to photography studio, private house, and art gallery is that the new interior takes advantage of the original loft structure, rather than abolishing it or changing the layout inside completely. Because it is located on a busy residential street in a heavily populated area, the goals of the redesign included modernizing the space in order to make it more productive, but also to do so without interrupting the quite, green street outside.

Though the photo studio aspect of the space’s functionality was the main priority, designers agreed that the apartment had a lot of potential and that they should harness that and arrange it in such a way that the whole flat could also be used for much more. While it was integral to create a space in which the client, a well known photographer in Izmir, could both live and work very comfortably, all parties quickly agreed that integrating the concept of art exhibition into the space could be an important aspect of its purpose as well.

Inside, the ground floor was built to fulfill all the needs of a functional photographic studio, with the added bonus of space for photo exhibition, meaning the client might display his own works or host events to display the works of other artists. The upper floors, however, were reserved for a more unique purpose that isn’t always found your average photo studio. Upstairs, visitors will find a peaceful office space, a fully functional kitchen, a cozy sleeping space, and quiet resting zones. The whole place has a wonderful atmosphere of productive work and self care balances.

Because the original goal of the space was to maximize creative areas for photo shooting, the upstairs floor still has a mezzanine space that might serve as a workspace as well. This is part of why the loft structure of the original apartment was kept true; the loft allows working, living, and exhibiting spaces to be intertwined in a way that’s at once organized and calm. It’s a true multi-functional area with a permeable atmosphere that works with the ebbs and flows of life, work, and the goals and needs that change along with each.

In order to really emphasize the exhibition aspect of the new studio, designers made sure the lovely glass walls out front open the ground floor right into the sidewalk. This creates a wonderful fusion of the inner workspace with the urban space outside on the bustling street and plays on the curiosity of passers by to keep the exhibition space lively. Closing the folding glass doors establishes boundaries with the public once more to keep the living space private and cozy when necessary. This fluid structure also gives the gallery a comfortable, social setting rather than feeling stuffy, formal, and removed from the world like some artistic galleries.

Photography by:

Refurbishment of Sa da Bandeira, A Stunning Portuguese Apartment Building by PF Architecture Studio

By • Nov 13, 2018

The Sa da Bandeira building is a stunning apartment structure that blends old and new. Located in downtown Porto in Portugal, it was recently completed by . It now contains six lovely 700 square metre apartments that feel bright and welcoming in every room.

Because it was previously a commercial service building, Sa da Bandeira has actually never been inhabited. It might look like the kind of typically beautiful 19th century residence that is so characteristic of downtown Porto from the outside, but the interior has a unique history. During its redesign, architects preserved several original decorative structure elements despite also adding new features. For example, the wood floors, oval skylights, and elaborately framed doorways were simply cleaned up and built around, incorporating them into the new apartments.

In addition to remodelling the existing interior, designers expanded one floor to create six newly renovated units. The building now features two apartments on each of its three floors. One of the most evidently unique features, noticeable immediately upon entering the building, is that the original entryway staircase was kept and redone. The apartments on the first floor harness the classic romanticism of 19th century architecture, while newly expanded floors higher up have a more simplified, modern feel.

Inside the units, the apartments were decorated with a pleasing visual aesthetic in mind. Designers aimed to maintain that original romantic atmosphere but also worked carefully to create a look that’s intended to be contemporary, eclectic, and strongly emotional. Some rooms bear patterned floors and graphic sections of wall paper or old fashioned looking alcoves. Others heavily feature pristine white surfaces, neutrally coloured furnishings, and accent pieces from the natural world. These balance the presence of wood in the floors, counters, and tabletops perfectly.

No matter which unit you visit, you’ll find wonderfully tall framed windows at the front of the building. These provide you with a lovely view of the street while also looking grand in their exterior from the outside.

Take a look at the floor plans for the various units:

 

Photographs by:

Modern Apartment with a Marked Industrial Style Designed for a Young Businessman

By • Nov 8, 2018

This fabulous and modern apartment located in the city of Kyiv, Ukraine, has been designed by the architects Ivan Yunakov, Olga Korniienko, Natali Raga, and Yaroslav Katrich, all working for the. The client was a young entrepreneur, and the home has a distinct industrial style.

Elegant entrance in black and gold

It has an area of 97 square meters and was carried out in 2018. In the interior, a palette of dark colors and a variety of materials were used, with different structures. Among those materials were brick, natural African black stone, onyx, leather, copper, and wood. Upon entering the apartment, the first thing we notice is the wall made of black stone on one side, and the black surface with golden decoration elements on the other side. The living room is combined with a kitchen, a dining room, and a work space.

Spacious and modern lounge
Elegant lounge area

The space was separated by using glass partitions, looking to align the boundaries between the facilities, but at the same time to achieve open and floating spaces. The glass structure is made by using the “smart glass” system technology; it can be converted to matt to achieve greater privacy within the room.

The panel that was used to balance the dark tones is white onyx with backlighting framed by copper edges. It works at night and creates a cozy atmosphere, and is the focal point of our interior, seen from all the main facilities of the apartment.

Modern furniture in leather
Stone wall
kitchen area
Modern kitchen with bronze details
Details
Sober dining room
Modern room with brick wall
Room connected with modern bathroom
Modern and elegant bathroom
Modern and elegant bathroom

Remodeling of an Old Apartment in one of the Best Areas of Barcelona, Spain

By • Oct 25, 2018

The was commissioned to carry out this project that consisted of the interior remodeling of an old apartment located in the Gracia neighborhood of Barcelona, Spain.

Walls and closet divide the spaces

The project focuses its efforts on a single strategy, which consists of opening the floor longitudinally. The entire project is condensed into a single gesture that manages to visually connect the street and the interior courtyard, joining the opposite and, until now, distant façades. A single element is the heart of this strategy. A new wardrobe crosses the entire house from one end to the other. Those in charge of this project, architects Irene Pérez and Jaume Mayol, who in 2017 managed to create functional and welcoming spaces in this 65 square meter floor.

Open entrance and full of natural light
Simple and cozy lounge area

There was, previously, a pavement of clay tiles of 13×13 cm placed diagonally. Its condition was not very good: it had been partially modified, there were many patches and different types of tiles, the result of alterations and overlapping modifications. It was decided, thus, to replace the pavement with a new one. They chose a hydraulic pavement manufactured by Huguet.

Small dining room with round wooden table
Entrance to the side kitchen
Narrow wooden kitchen
Entrance to the room with wooden doors

A Remodeling Creates a New Modern and Functional Space

By • Oct 16, 2018

This remodeling of an old floor of 807 ft2, located in Gràcia, Barcelona, was carried out by the and his team of professionals Pau Just and Cayetano de la Torre. The previous state of the apartment belonged to a way of life incompatible with the requirements of the new owner. Therefore, the new proposal starts from the total demolition of the pre-existing situation, maintaining only the structural system (for technical and economic reasons, structural interventions were ruled out).

Private lounge area
Living room in modern style

The space is intended to flow freely inside, to maximize the feeling of space and abolish the boundaries between the rooms: for example, both the bedroom and the guest bathroom are closed with large, large pivoting doors, from floor to ceiling, without perimeter frames. This means that partitions are not only interrupted when they reach the gaps in the doors.

Modern kitchen in black
Kitchen in black with marble top
Room area with sliding door
Room decorated in white

The bathroom is completely black, a mixture of ceramic, granite, microcemento and black varnish, and with taps, sinks and other accessories, all in black. On the other hand, the guest bathroom has the opposite treatment: here the granite, the microcement and the varnish are all white, although the sink and faucets are kept in black. The sliding and rotating iron and glass doors draw figures that blur the axes, but also mark areas of privacy and more visible areas.

Modern and sober bathroom in black
Sober bathroom in black
Bathroom






Fantastic Remodeling of a Flat in Barcelona, Spain, Dating From 1900

By • Oct 11, 2018

This comprehensive reform – of an apartment of 90 square meters in the city of Barcelona, Spain – to obtain a renewed and more luminous space was carried out by the architectural firm and was under the leadership of its professionals Marc Alventosa and Xavier Morell, in the year 2017.

Luminous lounge area

The clients wanted this apartment – located in an old building in the Born district of Barcelona, built in the year 1900, with little natural light and with numerous health problems – to receive a comprehensive reform. With this, they intended to obtian a renovated and more luminous space that could better fit their desires.

Lounge area with small terrace
Small and narrow kitchen area
Blank room with brick wall

The objective of the intervention was based on two criteria. On the one hand, to discover, recover, and highlight the original structural elements of high historical and constructive value. On the other hand, to generate a diaphanous space that would allow to improve the existing lighting and natural ventilation conditions.

Rectangular window with wooden frame

In spite of its antiquity, the apartment to reform did not keep any element of its original construction since it had undergone several reforms.

Thus, with some simple measures of recovery of original building elements and the design of a wooden furniture longitudinally that helped to separate the night area from the day, it was possible to meet the two objectives that had been specified and obtain a spacious and comfortable space to enjoy its livability.

Closet in wood
Bath in white and green

Fantastic Remodeling of two Old Houses in the City of Brussels, Belgium

By • Sep 18, 2018

This fantastic remodeling of two narrow houses that were in very poor condition, as they had been used by their former owner as a rental for students who needed cheap accommodation, was carried out in 2016 by the . The interior was designed by the firm and Denis Dujardin was in charge of the gardens.

Exterior view of the back garden

The property covers a total area of 500 square meters and is located in Brussels, Belgium. It is located in a prestigious and vibrant area of the city, in a basement with little insulation, with little air and little natural light inside. The project consisted in uniting the two houses while respecting the typology of the existing buildings and making the most of their new width to offer generous and luminous spaces to the new residents.

View of the garden from the inside
Modern and sober lounge

The front façade, a beautiful 19th century brick façade belonging to a row of similar houses, was restored and remained essentially intact. However, the large rear façade opened generously to encompass the south-facing garden.

There, wide glass doors open onto the wonderful garden where a dining room and an outdoor living area have been installed to spend time with friends and family while enjoying the good weather.

Sober living room in dark tones
Kitchen area
Dining room with glass walls
Studio area
Rustic stairs
Modern room in black and white
Bathroom with glass doors
Rustic style bathroom
Walk in closet
Study
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